U.S. Conducts Wildlife Crime Scene Investigation Training for Philippine Government

U.S. Embassy Deputy Chief of Mission John Law meets with Philippine government officials participating in wildlife crime scene investigation training.
U.S. Embassy Deputy Chief of Mission John Law meets with Philippine government officials participating in wildlife crime scene investigation training.
U.S. Embassy Deputy Chief of Mission John Law meets with Philippine government officials participating in wildlife crime scene investigation training.

Manila, February 14, 2020 — From February 10 to 14, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) conducted a Wildlife Crime Scene Investigation course for 19 Philippine government participants in Pasay, Metro Manila.  Participants included representatives from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, Bureau of Customs, Philippine Coast Guard, Philippine National Police – Maritime Group, and National Bureau of Investigation.

The course consisted of lectures and practical exercises on evidence collection, crime scene management, and latent print and impression evidence development to support prosecutions against wildlife-related offenses.  Additionally, a Philippine Department of Justice prosecutor led a session focused on best practices and lessons learned from recent environmental cases involving wildlife.

In his remarks to participants, U.S. Embassy Deputy Chief of Mission John Law emphasized that the U.S. and Philippines shared a strong concern for wildlife crime, and stressed the U.S. commitment to expanding cooperation against this challenge.